Law

How Does Long-Term Disability Work With Social Security Disability?

If you are disabled, you may feel overwhelmed, and that’s understandable. You may be overwhelmed not only with your disability itself and all of the treatment it requires but also with other concerns – many of them financial. After all, being disabled doesn’t mean that life stops in its tracks. Bills continue to come in, and your family continues to have needs that must be met. It can be very stressful to worry about how you will continue to meet those needs and provide for yourself and those you love while also being unable to work. 

As a result, many disabled individuals understandably want to seek the maximum amount of benefits they may be entitled to in order to relieve their financial stress, whether that means long-term disability, Social Security Disability, or other types of benefits that may be available, depending upon unique circumstances. 

Taking A Closer Look At Different Types Of Disability Benefits

Often, the different types of benefits may overlap, and receipt of one type might affect the amount of another. One question we’re often asked is, “How does long-term disability work with Social Security disability?” It’s an important question to ask. 

First and most importantly, those receiving disability benefits should keep in mind that insurance companies are businesses. As a result, they are interested in making and retaining profits. This means that they often seek to pay less out of their own pocket whenever possible. For that reason, many long-term disability policies will require applicants to apply for Social Security Disability benefits as a condition of receiving coverage. 

If an applicant is approved for both long-term disability benefits and Social Security Disability, the insurance company will typically seek to offset the amount of long-term disability benefits provided with the amount of Social Security Disability received. Thus, for example, if a disabled individual was receiving $2,000 per month in long-term disability benefits, and was then awarded $500 in Social Security Disability, the insurance company might seek to reduce the amount of long-term disability benefits paid to $1500 to account for the difference. 

It’s also important to keep in mind that an insurance company may, and often will, request copies of any documents related to your Social Security Disability claim. Although long-term disability and Social Security Disability usually have different definitions of disability and use different factors to make determinations, they may influence one another, so it’s important to be consistent in your reporting and your records.

Ultimately, the most important step you can take as you pursue either Social Security Disability benefits or long-term disability benefits is to retain a knowledgeable and experienced legal team who can guide you toward making the best decisions to maximize your chances of receiving the compensation you need and deserve. At The Clauson Law Firm, we’re here to help you do exactly that.

 

Your Social Security Disability Attorneys

Being disabled can be a difficult and stressful experience in many ways. The last thing you need is legal stress as well. Instead of worrying about complex legal matters and whether or not you’ve done all you can to seek the benefits you need and deserve, you should be focusing on your recovery, and on spending time with those you love. Social Security Disability Attorney, we’re here to help you through the legal process, so you can move forward to a better and brighter chapter ahead. 

 

Francis Babet loves pursuing excellence through writing and has a passion for Legal. He currently writes for The law Firm, a USA Based Law Firm that provides SSD, SSI, SSDI, Personal Injury, and Drugs and Devices. His work has been published on various sites related to Social Security Disability, Supplemental Security Income and more.